Special Focus on Diversity

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IEEE Transactions on Education table of contents for the special focus issue on enhancing socio-cultural diversity

The new special focus issue I spearheaded for IEEE Transactions on Education just arrived in my mailbox! It arrived alongside a number of other prestigious journals on engineering and higher education.

This issue is dedicated to helping increase social and cultural diversity in engineering fields relevant to IEEE, including electrical, electronics, and computer engineering. As a result of my work on this issue, I was appointed as an Associate Editor of the journal and I have a second special focus issue underway.

To give you a bit of information on it–the November 2018 issue on socio-cultural diversity–I’m sharing an early draft of our guest editorial. You’ll find the draft below, after the list of article titles. You can visit the journal’s homepage or follow the links I’ve provided to download individual articles. Our guest editorial statement is free, but many of the others will require you to purchase the article or log in via a university library website that pays for access. Please contact me if you need help accessing articles.

Shannon teaching with Nataschu saturated

A favorite photo from my days at Hampton University, with architecture students Nataschu Brooks

Fostering diversity and supporting diverse students has always been a focus of mine. I’m proud to have been associated with Hampton University, a Historically Black University in southeast Virginia, and to have been appointed Full Professor there in 2014. I try to bring what I learned there into the work I do here in Europe every day.

I’m also proud to have done research to increase understanding of how diverse students experience engineering education. I did much of this work at Dublin Institute of Technology, and I’m extending the impact of that work today through my current appointment as a Marie Curie Research Fellow at University College London (UCL), by publishing articles and special focus issues.

Screen Shot 2018-11-30 at 11.32.36 AMPublication by UCL and the Royal Academy of Engineering

UCL has a proud history of inclusivity, having admitted women and people from diverse races and religions long before most institutions did so. My amazing colleagues in UCL’s Centre for Engineering Education (CEE)–including Jan Peters, Emanuela Tilley, and John Mitchell–worked with the Royal Academy of Engineering in the UK to produce a groundbreaking report titled “Designing Inclusion into Engineering Education.” Techniques they developed have far wider applicability than just engineering, so please download a copy.

Articles in the Special Focus Issue

Description by guest editors

Universities and colleges struggle to find the best approaches for achieving diversity throughout their campus environments. Even after successfully recruiting diverse populations, challenges arise in providing appropriate support and developing engagement opportunities that help enable students’ success. Some students from minority populations may not have had schooling that was as well funded as their peers from the mainstream. They may arrive differently equipped, but not any less capable, than their peers. In this special focus issue, we asked: How do we support their efforts to succeed? How do we help faculty understand the challenges diverse students face? How can we affect change in the teaching methods they encounter?

This issue of the IEEE Transactions on Education (ToE) makes exciting contributions to the literature on teaching in fields including electrical and electronics engineering, computer engineering, and computer science. This issue represents an effort to positively influence engineering scholarship, engineering education, and engineering practice. It helps stake new territory for ToE with regard to format as well as the diversity of authors, topics, editors, and reviewers.

Regarding the presentation of content, this is ToE’s third issue to provide structured abstracts. This feature makes content more searchable and it also makes the questions guiding each study more explicit. The most noteworthy contributions and findings are identified clearly and succinctly, prior to the full text. These features help readers locate relevant content and more easily understand how the pieces fit together.

Even more importantly, this issue provides a platform for voices and perspectives from around the globe to explore facets of diversity relevant to IEEE. Although engineering education research (EER) on diversity has focused greatly on gender aspects, we aimed to explore many different aspects of diversity in this issue. All contributors provide concepts and techniques to foster equity and equality in engineering education.

The topics, authors, editors, and reviewers represent ever-widening diversity—geographically, socially, ethnically, racially, religiously, and otherwise. Our call for papers defined diversity broadly, in an effort to increase inclusion and equity in engineering classrooms and labs as well as in engineering publications. A primary intention has been to improve the participation rates of people from under-represented groups—particularly in computer science, electrical and electronic engineering, computer engineering, software engineering, and biomedical engineering—and to support their ongoing success in these fields.

The guest editors have lived and worked in multiple countries across Africa, Europe, and North America and were keen to involve diverse individuals throughout the publication process. We were acutely aware that many readers and authors of many US-based journals had lacked exposure to much of the work in EER being conducted outside the US. Citation analysis of 4321 publications across four prominent platforms—the Journal of Engineering Education (JEE), the European Journal of Engineering Education (EJEE), and conferences of both the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) and European Society of Engineering Education (SEFI)—had shown ASEE and JEE citations “are dominated by sources with US affiliations.” SEFI and EJEE reflected wider diversity in that “while US sources are frequently cited, European and other authors are also well represented (Williams, Wankat, & Neto, 2016, p. 190).” Thus, Williams et al demonstrated, “in citation terms, European EER is relatively global but US EER is not (p. 190).”

In response, the guest editors encouraged researchers active in the US to submit articles and they also worked to solicit manuscripts from around the world. They aimed to provide “complementary perspectives” as encouraged by Borrego and Bernhard (2013), whose study compared EER that originated in the US with EER from Northern and Central Europe. They found the latter tends to explore “authentic, complex problems, while U.S. approaches emphasize empirical evidence” (p. 14). They also found “disciplinary boundaries and legitimacy are more salient issues in the U.S., while the Northern and Central European Bildung philosophy integrates across disciplines toward development of the whole person” (p. 14). Informing this edition’s intent, Borrego and Bernhard asserted, “Understanding and valuing complementary perspectives is critical to growth and internationalization of EER” (p. 14).

Adopting a global perspective, this issue promotes research, advocacy, and action geared toward achieving equity. Authors have considered many facets of diversity, including race, ethnicity, economic status, religious affiliation, age, and multiple understandings of the term gender. Subsequent issues of IEEE ToE will extend this work by, for instance, featuring technologies developed to support learning in IEEE fields for people with physical disabilities. Supporting a range of approaches to diversity, this current issue features empirical research on engineering/STEM pedagogies, paying particular attention to their level of inclusivity for students and teachers from minority groups.

Research from Saudi Arabia that is included in this issue contributes new understanding of women’s experiences studying engineering there. The nation has only recently offered engineering programs in-country that are open to women; some of the engineering teachers are female, but many who deliver courses are male. Digital technologies, Mariam Elhussein and colleagues explain, are intended to bridge the divide in classrooms where women sit on one side of a glass partition while observing male teachers who deliver content. Technologies do not always achieve the desired aims, because female students explained during focus group discussions that they sometimes keep their digital devices off to avoid illuminating their faces and revealing their identities—a taboo in their culture. The study, authored by Mariam Elhussein, Dilek Düştegör, Naya Nagy, and Amani Alghamdi, is entitled “The Impact of Digital Technology on Female Students’ Learning Experience in Partition-Rooms: Conditioned by Social Context.”

Contributing new understanding regarding racially diverse learners in the US, Jumoke Ladeji-Osias et al. describe outcomes of an ongoing school program to engage black male youths in engineering and computing. These authors describe a program, running both after-school and during summers, wherein students develop mobile apps and build 3D-printed models to ignite their interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Having participated for two years, students reported more positive ideas about STEM and increased interest in attending university and entering a career in either science or app development. Unfortunately, participants did not show corresponding interest in taking science courses in school. The research team of Jumoke Ladeji-Osias, LaDawn Partlow, and Edward Dillo submitted this study, titled “Using Mobile Application Development and 3D Modeling to Encourage Minority Male Interest in Computing and Engineering.”

Contributing new understanding regarding socially and economically diverse learners who enter engineering via two-year colleges in the US, Simon Winberg and colleagues discovered a correlation between math performance in two-year colleges and persistence to graduation in the four-year degree. Such research can help educators to better advise students and recruit those likely to complete degrees. The authors mined data from institutional databases to analyze and compare the performance of transfer and non-transfer students. By calculating and comparing averages, frequencies of passes and failures, withdrawals and repeats, the authors identified factors associated with persistence-to-graduation in Bachelor of Science ECM programs. The study helps confirm prior research showing many minority students who transfer to four-year engineering programs demonstrate high levels of persistence, focus and commitment, resilience to overcome challenges, and they also had high grades at their two-year institution, cumulative and in mathematics. This study, by Simon Winberg, Christine Winberg, and Penelope Engel-Hills, is titled “Persistence, Resilience and Mathematics in Engineering Transfer Capital.”

Reporting from Spain, Noelia Olmedo-Torre et al. assess what attracts women to join STEM and select specific branches of engineering. The team collected survey data from more than 1000 women (graduates and current students) representing six different institutions of higher education. About 40% were in computing, communications, electrical and electronic engineering (CCEEE) and the rest in other STEM (non-CCEEE) fields where women are greatly under-represented. Women in CCEEE were significantly less motivated by “the possibility of working on projects ” and “the possibility of working as part of a team” than those outside CCEEE. This study also reveals women’s perceptions of why others avoid CCEEE majors. The article was submitted by Noelia Olmedo-Torre, Fermín Sánchez Carracedo, Núria Salán Ballesteros, David López, Antoni Perez-Poch, and Mireia López-Beltrán and it asks, “Do Female Motives for Enrolling Vary According to STEM Profile?”

In a similar study from the US, Geoff Potvin et al. worked together to assess how gender relates to an individual’s level of interest in electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering and to identify how these interests relate to students’ expectations of careers in each branch. They analyzed data collected from women and compared these data with people who had not identified themselves as women. The female group showed more interest in bioengineering/biomedical engineering and less interest in electrical and computer engineering. They associated the career outcome of “helping others” but not “supervising others” with bioengineering and/or biomedical engineering more strongly than non-female students did. Overall, students in this study associated inventing and designing things as well as “developing new knowledge and skills” with electrical engineering, whereas they envisioned inventing and designing things but not “working with people” in computer engineering. The research team was comprised of Geoff Potvin, Catherine McGough, Lisa Benson, Hank Boone, Jacqueline Doylek, Allison Godwin, Adam Kirn, Beverly Ma, Jacqueline Rohde, Monique Ross, and Dina Verdin, who worked together to assess “Gendered Interests in Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering: Intersections With Career Outcome Expectations.”

Two articles identify gender bias evident in team projects in engineering classrooms, that tends to go undetected and/or unreported by students. First, in a small-scale study with clear relevance in engineering classrooms around the globe, Laura Hirshfield’s US-based analysis shows that when students self-report regarding team performance and team dynamics, they may fail to see and/or report differences that have to do with the way they interact and allocate tasks. Although individuals submitted team assessments and interviews describing effective collaboration and a lack of gender bias in allocating roles, self-reports did not match the author’s observations nor the data she collected via interviews. Dynamics and assignments reflected visible gender bias, the author reports, yet male and female students reported the same levels of confidence and said they were similarly satisfied with their teams. To achieve greater equity, the author urges readers to look deeper and consider forms of stereotyping and gender bias that influence students’ experiences. Laura Hirshfield’s article is titled “Equal But Not Equitable: Self-Reported Data Obscures Gendered Differences in Project Teams.”

Similarly, authors Robin R. Fowler and Magel P. Su identified “Gendered Risks of Team-Based Learning: A Model of Inequitable Task Allocation in Project-Based Learning.” In this second article, we see that the jobs that are assigned by the team to its various members often fall along gender lines–sometimes because of assumptions made by team members and sometimes because individuals want to play it safe and promise things they know they can deliver well. This can hinder the diversity of experience they get and how well-rounded their skills ultimately become by way of the project.

Two of the papers in this issue focus on educators’ experiences. Reporting from India, Anika Gupta et al. have analyzed the ratings male and female students assign to their teachers as measures of the teaching quality. They identified statistically significant differences in the ratings given—differences that correspond to the teachers’ gender and socio-economic status. In addition to bias regarding socio-economic status, this research team also found same-gender and cross-gender biases that yielded statistically different scores for teaching. The team gathered over 100,000 complete surveys—comparing groups from (a) civil engineering, (b) computer science and engineering, (c) electrical engineering, (d) humanities and social sciences, and (e) mathematics. Similar to the study by Potvin et al., these results illustrate student perceptions of various majors. In this case, statistics showed that interaction between a student’s gender and socio-economic status and those characteristics of the teacher influenced the student’s evaluation of the teacher. As student evaluations are used to inform faculty promotion and retention decisions, it is reasonable to question the validity of the data they provide. The paper was submitted by Anika Gupta, Deepak Garg, and Parteek Kumar and is titled “Analysis of Students’ Ratings of Teaching Quality to Understand the Role of Gender and Socio-Economic Diversity in Higher Education.”

Kat Young and colleagues have assessed participation in audio engineering conferences, a field that remains strongly male-dominated. Their work provides a new tool for determining the gender of participants who do not report their own data, such as in cases where they are listed as authors in various publications and conference proceedings. The techniques presented in this paper consider that not all individuals identify in a binary way. As such, this manuscript contributes new knowledge related to LGTBQ+ and how to determine what gender an author would ascribe to their self in instances where they have not been asked to provide that data. The team analyzed four aspects of data from 20 conferences—looking at conference topic, presentation type, position in the author byline, and the number of authors involved. Data revealed a low representation of non-male authors at conferences on audio engineering as well as the significant variance in conference topic by gender, and the distinct lack of gender diversity across invited presentations. This paper is titled “The Impact of Gender on Conference Authorship in Audio Engineering: Analysis Using a New Data Collection Method” and it was submitted by Kat Young, Michael Lovedee-Turner, Jude Brereton, and Helena Daffern.

Prior research has shown that including diverse perspectives on STEM teams enables more robust and innovative designs (Hunt et al, 2018) and that cross-disciplinary teaming that can facilitate pooling of diverse perspectives is difficult to achieve in practice (Edmondson & Harvey, 2017). A challenge for engineering educators is to ensure the perspectives of diverse individuals we now recruit are fully heard—that all participants have the opportunity to have their contributions considered and valued. Many instructors have had little or no training on pedagogical approaches within STEM. Even well-intentioned instructors may not understand how team formation and management of teams can help reinforce peer teamwork, and they may not recognize that poorly managed and conducted can deplete the confidence of women and others outside the classroom’s mainstream. Instructors who are accustomed to assigning team projects may not be providing guidance and support and thus may ultimately throw students together, simply expecting them to be collaborative, equitable, and productive but not explaining how to achieve this. As a result, students may not perceive group work as a recipe for success, but rather an obstacle course suited to the fittest.

In this special issue of ToE, authors have presented insights generated through the study of student learning experiences. Some authors have introduced innovative methods to measure the impacts of new pedagogical approaches within institutions. Several have investigated pitfalls that could detract from the effectiveness and inclusiveness of teams. Others increased understanding of gender-identification procedures for researchers—this group also exposed perpetual underlying biases in the speaker-invitation process that all IEEE disciplines may benefit from assessing.

Diversity and inclusion are not a post-processing task tacked on in a course or mentioned in a lecture. A well-thought-out, integrated plan that places value on the different perspective of students from diverse backgrounds, genders and life-experiences. Educators are beginning to foster a sense of belonging by adopting techniques for “cohort building” among diverse groups of students. This can help bridge the gulf many students experience when they move from secondary school into higher education. Such techniques can help ensure diverse students’ expectations are met, so students do not find themselves isolated or alone.

The guest editors hope you enjoy this special issue of IEEE Transactions on Education and are able to incorporate some of the methods presented here—to help create a generation of future leaders and innovators. The editors encourage readers to review emerging calls for action in diversity recently published by The Power Electronics Industry Collaborative (PEIC), ASEE, and SEFI.

In this issue, editors channeled their efforts towards achieving fairness and holistic well being, and toward fostering a community of engineers who can address global challenges, act with vision and confidence, and develop effective and robust responses to engineering problems. When students are prepared with superior STEM skills and equipped with life-skills, they will be able to build their own interest-related cohorts and will be able to seek out the resources they need, without being afraid to ask for them. A more diverse group will be prepared to address global challenges.

—Shannon Chance, Laura Bottomley, Karen Panetta, and Bill Williams

References

Borrego, M., & Bernhard, J. (2011). The emergence of engineering education research as an internationally connected field of inquiry. Journal of Engineering Education100(1), 14-47.

Edmondson, A. C., & Harvey, J. F. (2017). Cross-boundary teaming for innovation: Integrating research on teams and knowledge in organizations. Human Resource Management Review.

Hunt, V., Prince, S., Dixon-Fyle, S., & Yee, L. (2018). Delivering through diversity. McKinsey & Company Report. Retrieved April3, 2018.

Williams, B., Wankat, P. C., & Neto, P. (2018). Not so global: a bibliometric look at engineering education research. European Journal of Engineering Education43(2), 190-200.

Get yourself a job in engineering education or Ph.D. fellowship in architecture pedagogy

For those of you interested in learning more about educational research or finding an academic position in engineering education research, I’m posting some exciting opportunities.

Architectural pedagogies, multiple intelligences and educational inclusion – funded PhD

shannon teaching bindings

Shannon Chance sharing examples of design portfolios and methods of book-binding with architecture students at Hampton University, a decade ago.

The first is a funded Ph.D. in the topics I love most: Architectural pedagogies, multiple intelligences and educational inclusion. This position will pay for someone to go to Northumbria, UK to get a Ph.D. in this very exciting topic.

Please bring this to the attention of potential candidates. This “Find a PhD” website is valuable for anyone wanting to find funding for doctoral studies. Most positions are open to people of all nationalities.

 

ASEE’s ERM division job posts

Next, I’m sharing an email I just received from the division of Educational Research Methods of the American Society for Engineering Education, listing jobs in engineering education that are open in the USA right now. Details and links are provided below the list, in the same order as listed. The list was compiled by Virginia Tech’s Dr. Holly M. Matusovich, who is doing excellent work through ASEE.

  1. Instructions for Submitted Announcements for the ERM Listserv
  2. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: (Updated) Faculty Search: Assistant OR Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Education, Virginia Tech
  3. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Associate Professor (Tenured Position), Wake Forest University Department of Engineering
  4. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Assistant Professor (Tenure Track Position), Wake Forest University Department of Engineering
  5. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Teaching Professor or Professor of the Practice, Wake Forest University Department of Engineering
  6. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Tenure-Track and Non-Tenure Track Positions in Civil & Environmental Engineering at The Citadel
  7. ITB RoboSlam 2015-4 hotrod

    An autonomous robot designed by electrical engineering students at ITB, now the Blanchardstown campus of TU Dublin. 

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: First-Year Director Job Description, Old Dominion University

  8. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: U-M Post Doctoral Teaching Fellowship in Engineering Education – International Teaching Experience
  9. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT:  12 lecturer positions in the Institute for Excellence in Engineering Education at the University of Florida
  10. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tenure Track Assistant/Associate Professor Faculty Position
  11. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT:  Two Lecturer Positions, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Engineering Fundamentals Program (EFP)
  12. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT:  Tenured Faculty Position in the Department of Engineering Education at Ohio State University
  13. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: : Multiple tenure-track positions at the rank of assistant or associate levels, School of Engineering Education at Purdue University
  14. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Tenure-track and visiting faculty, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
  15. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Six tenure-track faculty positions at the assistant professor level, The R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis
  16. CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: Engineering Education CAREER Webinar

 

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  1. Instructions for Submitted Announcements for the ERM Listserv

 

To send an announcement to the ERM listserv, please prepare a 2-3 paragraph description including any relevant URLs and contact info as well as a subject line. Do not include any attachments. Be sure that the announcement includes the person to contact with questions.  Email all of this information to matushm@vt.edu with [ERM Announcement] in the subject line to facilitate email sorting. Announcements will be sent out on the 1st and 15th of each month.  Each set of announcements will be included in the announcements email twice. Announcements will also be recorded on the ERM website: http://erm.asee.org/

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: (Updated) Faculty Search: Assistant OR Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Education, Virginia Tech

The Department of Engineering Education (EngE) at Virginia Tech invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the assistant or associate professor rank. Candidates must hold a doctorate (by August 2019) in engineering education, engineering, education, or a related field; at least one degree (BS, MS, PhD) in engineering or a related field is desirable.

Successful candidates will demonstrate the potential to conduct research in engineering education, secure external research funding, teach in both our first-year and graduate programs, and collaborate within and beyond the department. We welcome applicants with expertise across a wide range of engineering education areas and methods. Our faculty hold degrees in diverse fields, including engineering education, higher education, educational psychology, and linguistics as well as a range of STEM disciplines. Experience in industry is also welcome.

Applications must be submitted online to http://jobs.vt.edu (posting number TR0180132).  Review of applications will begin November 26, 2018. Applications should include: (1) a curriculum vitae, (2) a two-page research statement describing current research and future plans, (3) a two-page teaching statement, and (4) names and contact information for three references. Details on how to prepare and submit all materials can found under “Posting Details” for this position on the website. Inquiries about the position should be directed to Chair, EngE Search Committee, 345 Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Rd., Blacksburg, VA 24061,engesearch18@vt.edu

A more detailed description of the position and information about the Department of Engineering Education can be found at http://www.enge.vt.edu/

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Associate Professor (Tenured Position), Wake Forest University Department of Engineering

 

Job Requisition No: R0001130  The new Department of Engineering invites applications at the rank of Associate Professor in any engineering area to begin in the fall semester of 2019. Commensurate with the level of experience, the successful candidate will be appointed to a tenured position in the Department of Engineering and will help establish the new undergraduate engineering program.  We seek a colleague who will diversify our team through their scholarly pursuits and will provide significant educational contributions in support of our students’ development as engineers. Wake Forest University (WFU), a top-30 nationally ranked university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, welcomed its inaugural class of engineering students in August 2017. As a collegiate university, WFU combines the tradition and intimacy of a small liberal arts college with the innovation and vitality of a research university.  Interested applicants should apply via the University’s career website at: http://www.wfu.careers/. Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled with new applications reviewed on a regular cycle. Further information is available atcollege.wfu.edu/engineering/.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Assistant Professor (Tenure Track Position), Wake Forest University Department of Engineering

 

Job Requisition No: R0000982  The new Department of Engineering at Wake Forest University invites applications at the rank of Assistant Professor in any engineering area to begin in the fall semester of 2019. The successful candidate will be appointed to a tenure-track position in the Department of Engineering and will help establish the new undergraduate engineering program.  We seek a colleague who will diversify our team through their scholarly pursuits and will provide significant educational contributions in support of our students’ development as engineers. Wake Forest University (WFU), a top-30 nationally ranked university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, welcomed its inaugural class of engineering students in August 2017. As a collegiate university, WFU combines the tradition and intimacy of a small liberal arts college with the innovation and vitality of a research university.  Interested applicants should apply via the University’s career website at: http://www.wfu.careers/. Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled with new applications reviewed on a regular cycle. Further information is available atcollege.wfu.edu/engineering/.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Teaching Professor or Professor of the Practice, Wake Forest University Department of Engineering

 

Job Requisition No: R0001129  The new Department of Engineering at Wake Forest University invites applications for a Teaching Professor or Professor of the Practice faculty position (at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor) in any engineering area to begin in the fall semester of 2019.  Faculty members with the title of Teaching Professor hold a Ph.D. or terminal degree in the discipline, while faculty members with the title of Professor of the Practice have at least a Master’s Degree in the discipline along with relevant experience different from that achieved through traditional graduate and professional study. The contributions of teaching professionals are significant and cover a broad range of areas, which include teaching, advising and service to their programs, departments, the College, and the University. The successful candidate will diversify our team through their engineering expertise and will provide significant educational contributions in support of our students’ development as engineers. Wake Forest University (WFU), a top-30 nationally ranked university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, welcomed its inaugural class of engineering students in August 2017. As a collegiate university, WFU combines the tradition and intimacy of a small liberal arts college with the innovation and vitality of a research university.  Interested applicants should apply via the University’s career website at: http://www.wfu.careers/. Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2018, and will continue until the position is filled with new applications reviewed on a regular cycle. Further information is available atcollege.wfu.edu/engineering/.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Tenure-Track and Non-Tenure Track Positions in Civil & Environmental Engineering at The Citadel

 

The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina invites applications for a tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor level or a non-tenure track lecturer position.  The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a unique public institution with the mission of educating principled leaders through its Corps of Cadets and Graduate College. We are seeking applicants with in Environmental Engineering, Structural Engineering, or Construction Engineering.  Minimum qualifications for the tenure track faculty position includes an earned PhD in Civil Engineering, Construction Engineering, or related fields. The successful candidate will have demonstrated a potential and interest in undergraduate education as well as graduate education; undergraduate research, and a strong potential for and commitment to student advising, supporting our nationally recognized student activities, and continuous professional development in both civil or construction engineering, and engineering education.  Minimum qualifications for the non-tenure track instructor position include an earned MS in civil engineering or related field, plus five years of experience, or an earned PhD in Civil Engineering, Construction Engineering, or related fields.  The successful candidate will have demonstrated a potential and interest in undergraduate education and have design/field experience.  Professional registration/ certification or potential for and strong commitment towards obtaining it should be demonstrated for both positions. The applicant must be an effective communicator and be able to serve as a role model for students in the Corps of Cadets and to other students in our day and evening programs.  For more information and to apply:  http://careers.pageuppeople.com/743/cw/en-us/job/495551/assistant-professor-engineering.  Please contact Dr. Mary Katherine Watson (mwatson9@citadel.edu) with questions.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: First-Year Director Job Description, Old Dominion University

 

The Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University (ODU) invites applications from accomplished individuals with an earned PhD or equivalent degree in engineering to serve as the Inaugural Director of our First Year Engineering Program starting Fall 2019. The successful candidate is expected to provide leadership in shaping and coordinating our program and courses (structure, curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment); promoting consistency in course contents, standards and instructional modes across different classes; supervising all first-year faculty; coordinating with faculty teaching in the program and related departments (e.g., Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry); and teaching sections of the relevant classes as appropriate. Salary and rank will be based on experience and qualifications.

 

We seek an individual with strong accomplishments in disciplinary and/or engineering education research, who has an established pedagogical track record in working with undergraduate engineering students. Also of interest is a person who can work effectively with local and regional companies in providing solutions to Engineering problems. An interest in engineering education best practices, research, and assessment are desirable attributes. Candidates must be committed to contributing to high-quality education of a diverse student body at the undergraduate level.

 

Review of applications will begin January 15, 2019 and will continue until the position is filled. Complete applications will include a cover letter, a current CV, teaching statement, pedagogical innovations, assessment of teaching (if not included in CV), diversity statement, and four references that will be contacted at a later time. The College and University are strongly committed to a diverse academic environment and places high priority on attracting female and underrepresented minority candidates. We strongly encourage candidates from these groups to apply for the position. Application materials should be submitted to:https://jobs.odu.edu/postings/8857

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: U-M Post Doctoral Teaching Fellowship in Engineering Education – International Teaching Experience

 

We are seeking one post doctoral teaching fellow for a collaboration between the University of Michigan (U-M) Department of Biomedical Engineering and Shantou University (Shantou, Guangdong Province, China).  This “train the trainer” engineering education collaboration will lead to the development of the next generation, experiential biomedical engineering curriculum to meet 21st century challenges.  Fellows are mentored by U-M instructors on the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor campus and then travel to Shantou University, where they participate in the development and launch of similar courses for the new Shantou University Biomedical Engineering Program.  The goal of this collaboration is to introduce innovative, evidence-based pedagogical practices into the Shantou classroom.

 

Applicants should submit letter of interest, vita, teaching statement, teaching evaluations, and list of three references to aileenhs@umich.edu. Applicants are encouraged, but not required, to submit some type of media that demonstrates their teaching (e.g. link to video of the applicant teaching or an example of an instructional intervention designed by the applicant). Review of applications will begin on February 1, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. The start date is negotiable between June and September 2019.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT:  12 lecturer positions in the Institute for Excellence in Engineering Education at the University of Florida

 

The Institute for Excellence in Engineering Education (IE³) at the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering, University of Florida invites applications for multiple, up to 12 full-time, nine-month, or twelve-month non-tenure track positions at the level of Lecturer, Sr. Lecturer or Master Lecturer. The anticipated hiring rank is Lecturer with most positions at twelve-month appointments.  Senior levels may be considered based upon experience or the need of the unit. The ideal candidate would have experience in teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in their respective engineering field.   The University of Florida is embarking on an initiative to lead the nation in Digital Literacy by 1) Foster Digital Literacy across campus in the use of these tools, 2) Develop and apply the Platform for Life Tools to our education and research endeavors, 3) Promote Digital Responsibility – Manage the human impact of the coming transformation of society.  Several lecturer positions will be allocated to this initiative.

 

Duties and responsibilities include: teaching, revising, and developing undergraduate and graduate engineering courses, and may include both online as well as face-to-face instruction in one or more of the following areas:  Computer Science Courses, General Engineering Courses such as Freshmen Design, Non-majors Circuits, and Statics.  In addition, there may be other service and teaching activities at local, university, state, and national level, as directed by the Institute Director. IE³ is specifically looking for faculty with a passion for teaching and a desire to develop a career in pedagogy of engineering education.  Teaching assignments will be made according to background and experience and will be six to eight course sections per year (twelve-month appointment) based on mutual agreements.  To apply and for more information: https://apply.interfolio.com/58175  Questions may be directed to Hans van Oostrom, Ph.D., Institute Director, oostrom@ufl.edu (352) 392-1345

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tenure Track Assistant/Associate Professor Faculty Position

 

The Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Lowell seeks a full-time faculty member at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor with expertise in Biomedical Engineering. We have an emphasis on medical device development, but candidates with expertise in medical imaging, bioinstrumentation and biomechanics, as well as other biomedical engineering fields are encouraged to apply. The successful candidate will be expected to coordinate and teach courses geared towards Biomedical Engineering majors as well as perform research. The position includes service contributions to the Department and the University. Apply at: https://secure.dc4.pageuppeople.com/apply/822/gateway/?c=apply&lJobID=494699&lJobSourceTypeID=809&sLanguage=en-us Questions may be directed to Bryan Buchholz., Interim Chair of Biomedical Engineering, bryan_buchholz@uml.edu

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Two Lecturer Positions, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Engineering Fundamentals Program (EFP)

 

The Engineering Fundamentals Program (EFP) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, seeks two dynamic Lecturers to contribute to its innovative, first-year engineering program. EFP is the home of the engage program, an integrated and team-taught freshman curriculum, and is responsible for teaching nine credit hours of common freshman coursework for each of the College’s first year students (1000 per year). Subject matters taught include physics, perspective of the engineering profession, teaming, design process with projects, engineering communication and basic computer instruction. EFP also teaches a sophomore computer programming course and other classes, such as First-Year Studies classes, focused on skills for success during the transition from high school to college, and a leadership class for peer mentors who support the Engage Living and Learning Community, a 200+ student residential community for first year students in the Tickle College of Engineering.  Details of the Engineering Fundamentals Program are available at http://ef.utk.edu.

 

These positions are full-time, non-tenure-track, 9-month appointments. Candidates are expected to have an earned doctorate in engineering with an undergraduate degree in any engineering discipline; strongly preferred are candidates with a doctorate in engineering education. Candidates must possess excellent communication skills, and a solid commitment to innovative teaching methods, both traditional and technology enabled.  Demonstrated interest in engineering education programs is expected. College-level teaching experience and educational research experience evidenced by refereed conference and journal publications and participation on funded grants are strongly preferred. Professional registration is desirable.

 

Applications should include: (1) a letter of interest addressing qualifications and teaching interests, (2) a comprehensive curriculum vitae, and (3) the names and contact information (address, phone number, and e-mail address) for at least three professional references.  Please send a single electronic file (pdf) as an e-mail attachment to mcopley@utk.edu.  Questions about the position should be directed to Dr. Richard Bennett, Chair of the Search Committee, (voice: 865.974.9810; email: rmbennett@utk.edu).  Anticipated starting date is August 2019.

 

For more information, please see the full job posting at: https://webapps.utk.edu/humanresources/utjoblist/PrintJob.aspx?ID=22794

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT:  Tenured Faculty Position in the Department of Engineering Education at Ohio State University

 

The Ohio State University invites applications for a tenured faculty position at the rank of Associate Professor or Professor to start August 2019. We are seeking proven, innovative scholars in engineering and/or computing education who will help build the Department of Engineering Education (EED, https://eed.osu.edu/) that was formed in November 2015. Highly competitive candidates have: pioneered significant scholarly contributions to engineering and/or computing research, shown that they can collaborate with both tenure-track and non-tenure-track faculty members from different disciplines, and experience in applying evidence-based pedagogical teaching techniques with attention to inclusion of multiple perspectives and demographics.  Successful candidates will be expected to continue to secure external funding to support graduate students and research, cultivate department research initiatives, and collaborate with scholars within the department, within the college, within the university, and across the engineering and/or computing research communities. In addition, they will be expected to contribute to continued improvement of our first-year engineering fundamentals courses, our engineering technical communication courses, or our multidisciplinary campus courses that includes capstone design courses. Finally, they will be expected to build our graduate program and research enterprise.

 

Interested applicants should submit an application in Academic Jobs Online:https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/12602. Please include a cover letter, curriculum vita, statements of teaching and research interests, and names and contact information of five references commensurate with the rank sought. The Ohio State University College of Engineering is strongly committed to promoting diversity and inclusion in all areas of scholarship, instruction and outreach. In the cover letter, describe experiences, current interests or activities, and/or future goals that promote a climate that values diversity and inclusion in one or more of these areas. The Ohio State University is committed to establishing a culturally and intellectually diverse environment, encouraging all members of our learning community to reach their full potential. We are responsive to dual-career families and strongly promote work-life balance to support our community members through a suite of institutionalized policies. We are an NSF Advance Institution, a member of the Ohio/Western Pennsylvania/West Virginia Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC), and have an excellent partner in The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The Ohio State University is an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, or protected veteran status.  Application deadline: December 31, 2018.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Multiple tenure-track positions at the rank of assistant or associate levels, School of Engineering Education at Purdue University

 

The School of Engineering Education at Purdue University invites applications for multiple tenure-track positions at the rank of assistant or associate levels. Purdue University seeks to attract exceptional candidates with interests and expertise in engineering education research ranging from pre-kindergarten through college and into engineering practice. Commensurate with rank, new faculty will be expected to develop (or continue to develop) a nationally or internationally recognized, externally-funded research program in engineering education, advise graduate students, teach graduate and undergraduate level courses – including in first-year engineering, Multidisciplinary Engineering, or Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies programs – and perform service at the School, University, and professional society levels.

 

Please find the full position description at https://engineering.purdue.edu/Engr/InfoFor/Employment/JobDescriptions/171/ENE%20Ad.pdf. Review of applications began on November 1, 2018 and will continue until all positions are filled. Applications are still being accepted for full consideration. For information or questions regarding applications, contact the search committee chair, Tamara Moore at tmoore@purdue.edu.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: Tenure-track and visiting faculty, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

 

The Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology invites applications for tenure track and Visiting faculty positions with an anticipated start date of August 2019. The department, which continues to experience strong enrollment growth (currently 425 students), offers B.S. degrees in computer science and software engineering.
Requirements include a doctorate or near completion in computer science, software engineering or closely related field (including engineering education with an emphasis on these fields) and evidence of or demonstrated potential for excellence in undergraduate teaching. We are looking for candidates from all areas of computer science and software engineering who embrace the mission and vision of Rose-Hulman to join our collegial team of 23 faculty.   The department and the institute place a high value on engaging students from traditionally underrepresented groups, and candidates from these groups are especially encouraged to apply. Candidates who can broaden and enhance the educational experience of our students are also encouraged to apply. Rose-Hulman also offers a multidisciplinary, project-driven engineering design major, a multidisciplinary robotics minor, an ongoing research project on human-robot collaboration, and the National Academy of Engineering’s Grand Challenges program among its vibrant interdisciplinary initiatives.

 

If you have questions and or concerns, please email Sriram Mohan at mohan@rose-hulman.edu  Applicants should submit a cover letter, a curriculum vita or resume, a statement on their teaching philosophy and practices, a statement of their professional development goals, and a statement regarding their experience or other evidence of commitment to diversity and inclusion to https://jobs.rose-hulman.edu.

 

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  1. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT:  Six tenure-track faculty positions at the assistant professor level, The R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis

 

The R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis (UIndy) is seeking teacher-scholars for six tenure-track faculty positions at the assistant professor level (9-month contract) with an expected start date of August 2019.Our mission is to use interdisciplinary education to develop modern engineering leaders who create outstanding solutions. The School’s mission is accomplished through the DesignSpine,  which provides students with an interdisciplinary design experience throughout their entire academic tenure. These experiences involve projects sourced from external stakeholders, which expose students to design for Six-Sigma, project management, entrepreneurial mindset, and communication. The School has programs in computer science, industrial and systems engineering, mechanical engineering, and software engineering. We are launching programs in computer engineering, electrical engineering, and general engineering starting in the Fall of 2019. To accommodate this growth, the School has a plan to expand into new facilities on campus.

The faculty in the School are comprised of individuals from wide-ranging backgrounds and experiences where collaboration is highly encouraged and supported – including a School structure without department boundaries. The faculty’s educational backgrounds span multiple engineering, computer science, and physical science disciplines, and include those with significant industrial, consulting, entrepreneurial, and project management experience. Our diverse team is dedicated to effective and innovative teaching methodologies, which include a rigorous first-year program, project-based learning, service learning, and current topics courses. Team building and design activities begin from the first day of classes and are reinforced throughout the curriculum. Our small class sizes and experienced professors allow students to design and direct coursework based on their interests, industry trends, and internship experiences.

Review of applications begins December 1st and will continue until all positions are filled. For more information, please see our posting at https://uindy.hyrell.com/VirtualStepPositionDetails.aspx?TemplateId=257773

Questions may be directed to Dr. Jose Sanchez at sanchezjr@uindy.edu

 

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  1. CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: Engineering Education CAREER Webinar

 

Julie Martin, the program director for Engineering Education in the EEC Division of NSF, will be hosting a webinar for prospective CAREER PIs on Monday, December 17 from 1-2pm Eastern. Participants are invited to send questions to Julie ahead of time to be answered during the webinar. Please log in a few minutes early to join the meeting. Meeting number (access code): 903 505 576. Meeting password: Career@2018. Join by phone by dialing 1-510-210-8882. The webinar will be recorded. Live captioning will be provided: click here for live captioning and enter event number 3795027.

 

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Holly M. Matusovich, PhD

Associate Professor

Assistant Department Head for Undergraduate Programs

Engineering Education

Virginia Tech

355 Goodwin Hall

matushm at vt dot edu

Perched atop UCL for an Away Day strategizing engineering education

Perched high above UCL, in the penthouse Marconi room, University College London’s engineering education experts assembled on November 29th at the uppermost point of the Bloomsbury campus to discuss progress and strategy for the future. I was delighted with the sweeping views toward East London, where I live, and my co-researcher Dr. Inês Direito and I selected seats where we could watch the color of the sky shift throughout the day.

UCL staff from the Institute of Education (IoE), Arena Centre for Research-Base Education, and Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Integrated Engineering Programme and the Centre for Engineering Education where I’m working) joined together for a half-day retreat. We started with a light lunch so that we could get re-acquainted and welcome a guest from McGill University in Canada. I myself am here for two years as a Marie Curie Research Fellow, on a career break from Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT).

Our Centre for Engineering Education (CEE) has two directors. Professor David Guile is from the Institute of Education and Professor John Mitchell is from the Faculty of Engineering Sciences. John ran the meeting.

After introductions, we got updates on CEE activities as well as a synopsis of our core mission. Emanuela Tilley, Director of UCL’s Integrated Engineering Programme (IEP) provide an update and John Mitchell described progress building the university’s new campus in Stratford, East London. The campus is called Here East and will eventually include space for our Centre.

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Emanuela Tilley providing updates on UCL’s award-winning IEP

We learned about the new Masters in Engineering and Education that CEE and IoE recently launched. There are six MSc students in the current, inagural cohort and its organizers anticipate bringing in 20 additional students next year. I’ll be delivering a session for this degree program in January, on learning theories. I’m hoping that DIT’s MSc in aBIMM (Masters in applied Building Information Modeling and Management technologies) can provide a helpful precedent for organizing the thesis portion of the program, as my colleagues Deborah Brennan and Dr. Avril Behan have already achieved creative solutions to address the types of challenges our UCL team faces, as identified by Jay Derrick and David Guile. I’ll work to connect these four people.

Near the end of the meeting, Inês and I provided updates on our current and planned research projects. I mentioned contributions we’ve made to the larger community of engineering education researchers, running multiple workshops at SEFI 2018, providing leadership on journals like IEEE Transactions on Education, and collaborating with the CREATE research group at DIT, my home institution. I wrapped up by identifying the research projects that we have in progress—two that use phenomenology as well as two phenomenographic studies and two systematic reviews. I should have mentioned the special focus issue I have underway on using design projects to promote student development, but I forgot!

Copenhagen to Athens to Kos: A hop, skip, and a jump from SEFI to ICL

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Copenhagen

Following last week’s meeting of the European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) in Copenhagen, I enjoyed a post-conference dinner with colleagues, explored Copenhagen’s old town in the morning, and then jetted off to Greece for a second international conference–this one on Interactive Collaborative Learning (ICL). I spent a day in Athens en route, inspiring a deep sense of awe! For an architect like me, visiting the Acropolis is a must, and the experience was even more uplifting than I’d expected. I loved Athens and I will certainly return!

The photo album in this post includes photos of the day I spent cycling around Kos with my colleague, Dr. Stephanie Ferrall, and also from my one-day layover in Athens. It also provides a glimpse into the conference events to show what the work of a traveling researcher really looks like.

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Athens

The highlight of the ICL conference was getting to know colleagues with similar interests. I particularly enjoyed getting to know the Portuguese and Sri Lankan delegations and the keynote speakers.

Presentations were interesting and informative and I’ve posted photos of Anuradha Peramunugamage (from Sri Lanka), Stephanie Ferrall (USA), Christina Aggor (Ghana), and Rovani Sigamoney (currently from France) presenting their work.

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Dr. Ferrall’s ICL keynote

Stephanie was a big reason I attended. I submitted a paper for this conference after seeing she was listed as a keynote speaker. Stephanie and I were research fellows in Dublin together at DIT during the academic year 2014-2015. Stephanie is a world expert in engineering education pedagogy and in supporting LGBTQ+ students. She is currently the national president of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). Her work focuses on inclusivity and “revolutionizing diversity” in engineering schools. Stephanie’s keynote speech at ICL focused on classroom diversity whereas the keynote she delivered the week before, at SEFI, described large-scale patterns and philosophies regarding diversity. At ICL, Stephanie was honored by the International Society for Engineering Pedagogy (IGIP) with its highest award, the Nikola Tesla chain.

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My ICL presentation

I was also drawn to this conference because much of my research has to do with engineering students’ experiences of collaborative learning and that is the core subject of the conference.

At the ICL conference, I presented one line of my analysis, a study of Middle Eastern women’s experiences studying engineering abroad in Ireland. I collected interviews with eight such women over a period of four years. You can download “Middle Eastern Women’s Experiences of Collaborative Learning in Engineering in Ireland” at this link: https://arrow.dit.ie/engschcivcon/109/. The citation for the paper is:

Chance, S. M., Williams, B. (2018). Middle Eastern Women’s Experiences of Collaborative Learning in Engineering in Ireland. International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning (ICL) in Kos Island, Greece, 2018.

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Bike tour of Kos Island

As there were a few days free between SEFI and ICL, I’d gotten to spend time exploring Kos with Stephanie before the second conference. I posted some photos of us on Facebook with a notable but unanticipated effect. A colleague of mine from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in the USA, Christopher Kochtitzky, took notice and reached out to connect with Stephanie since their goals for changing the world overlap.

img_0173Thus, one of my top accomplishments of this conference was connecting my colleagues from the CDC and ASEE. Soon Stephanie and Chris will be working together. They will connect engineering educators and students with the CDC’s new initiatives to increase physical activity across the US population and to improve public transportation, particularly with regard to accessibility. Stephanie will be able to tap into Chris’s experience and policy research and Chris will access Stephanie’s national contacts to help achieve CDC goals.

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On the Acropolis in Athens

The best surprise of my trip to Kos was meeting and getting to know Rovani Sigamoney from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). This organization does amazing work. UNESCO was created following WWII to help preserve cultural monuments, artifacts, and places. Today it seeks to get better educational opportunities to the world population and to improve living conditions. I’ve always admired UNESCO’s work but saw it as a big, far-away organization. Now I see ways I can contribute, and I’m getting straight to work! Thanks, Rovaini, for the fine job you’re doing with the engineering division!

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UNESCO’s Rovani Sigamoney

On the last evening of my trip, I dined alone. The waiters provided my favorite dessert, although it wasn’t on the menu, and they made it a gift. Shortly before that, I had snapped a photo of the Kos police station in the evening light (see the end of the photo gallery). Little did I know I’d be back at that station in the morning, to report that I’d dropped my purse.

Into every life, a little rain must fall, and in this case, my purse fell off the back of the e-bike I had rented to get around town on the last day. With the generosity of many different people, I managed to make my way back to London late Saturday night. Now I’m working to recover all those bank cards and government-issued photo IDs. Thankfully, though, I still have my health and my happiness and great memories of Copenhagen and Kos, and friends new and old.

SEFI—researching Engineering Education with the Europeans

img_9347I’ve just attended the world’s friendliest conference, the European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI). I’ve never felt more welcome and invigorated by the exchange of ideas at a conference. This was my third SEFI, and while I’ve always felt incredibly welcome here, I now know people from all corners of the world by first name and they greet me likewise.

Last Sunday, I flew to Copenhagen from Nice, landing in the evening and traveling out to the campus of Denmark Technical University early Monday morning to help deliver an all-day workshop on research methods for PhD students. The workshop was coordinated by Prof. Jonte Bernhard, Dr. Kristina Edström, and Dr. Tinne de Laet. I also attended the conference’s opening ceremony and reception at Microsoft’s Danish HQ that evening.

img_9491Tuesday started bright and early with a keynote speech–delivered by Dr. Stephanie Farrell who was a Fulbright Fellow to Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) while I was a Marie Curie Fellow there. Although each morning started with a keynote lecture, for me, Stephanie’s was the most insightful of all. Attendees asked dozens of questions at the end, with another dozen people standing in line to ask questions afterward.

In all, there were three past DIT Fulbright Scholars at the conference–Stephanie, Dr. Sheryl Sorby, and me. The fact that three past DIT Fulbright scholars are still contributing to European EER on a regular basis and attending SEFI shows how a modest investment to support a Fulbrighter can pay dividends. We all still proudly represent DIT in various activities!

img_9308Following the Thursday morning keynotes, we enjoyed a fun new poster-presentation format. Poster authors got 30 seconds each to pitch their topic to the entire delegation, and then we went to visit their posters. This format raised the profile of posters as well as attendees’ interest in discussing them.

On this day, I also attended a session on writing for the European Journal for Engineering Education, got invited to serve on the journal’s Editorial Board by editors (Drd. Edström, Bernhard, and Maartje van den Bogaard), and networked with colleagues from Europe, North America, and Australia. Afterward, back in the city center, I enjoyed a lively dinner with editors from four different journals.

Working Groups were the focus on Wednesday, and I helped deliver a series of sessions of the Engineering Education Research (EER) Working Group, spearheaded by our leader Dr. Tinne de Laet. I’m a member of this group’s Governing Board, and since we meet monthly online, we didn’t need to conduct a business meeting here. In our morning session, each Board member briefly described her/his current projects. Participants each chose one Board member to join for small-group discussion. My small group discussed (1) tips for winning fellowship grants and (2) epistemology and identity topics related to EER. Later in the day, the Working Group ran a workshop where participants reviewed high-quality research papers and discussed their characteristics. During lunch and breaks–which were full of fascinating discussion with colleagues–I conferred with colleagues from Dublin Institute of Technology (Prof. Brian Bowe, Prof. Mike Murphy, Mr. Kevin Gaughan, Ms. Una Beagon, Ms. Diana Adele Martin, and Mr. Darren McCarthy) on plans to host an Inaugural Lecture at DIT this autumn. The lecture will be delivered by Dr. Bill Williams, who has just been appointed Adjunct Senior Researcher at DIT (upon my nomination–yay!). Since we intend to invite colleagues from other institutions, and particularly my colleagues from University College London, I worked to find an appropriate date and to identify the topics of Bill’s upcoming lecture and also the EER workshop he will conduct for our research group. Stay tuned for details!

img_9405After lunch, I attended a session on “Increasing the Impact of your Journal Publications” conducted by editors of the Journal for Engineering Education, Dr. Lisa Benson and Dr. Cindy Finelli. For dinner, the EER Working Group Board met in town.

Thursday morning, delegates attended presentations by individual scholars regarding their research projects. We used a range of formats including lecture, discussion, and flipped-classroom.

Over lunch, I worked with UCL colleagues, Ms. Emanuela Tilley, and Prof. John Mitchell, on strategic planning for a new Architectural Engineering curriculum we are developing. Throughout the conference, I enjoyed comparing notes with members of UCL’s Centre for Engineering Education who attended, including Emanuela, John, Dr. Inês Direito, Dr. Able Nayamapfene, and Ms. Paula Broome.

img_9380After lunch, I presented as part of the session “Reviewers! Reviewers! Reviewers!” In this session, editors of four journals explained what they are aiming to publish and how to write good reviews. I was representing IEEE Transactions on Education, the journal for which I am Associate Editor. We broke into small groups to identify characteristics of a good peer review and this was followed by a very insightful whole-group discussion.

After the workshop, I attended the Editorial Board meeting for EJEE, learning about our reach and impact from the publisher’s representative.

img_9440Late in the afternoon, everyone at the conference boarded buses for Copenhagen’s Experimentarium, a really fun science-learning center. I played with the educational exhibits alongside Stephanie’s family and other colleagues from DIT, UCL, and Fulbright. There was an awards ceremony, where our UCL colleague, Dr. Eva Soerensson was honored, and I thoroughly enjoyed the conference “gala” dinner. I sat with Belgian, Dutch, and British colleagues at dinner. We got a bit rowdy and ended up building towers from paper cups and discussing the feature of ubiquitous household appliances.

853e6054-964c-402e-b996-e9ee3e8191a1The final day of the conference had many individual poster and paper presentations, including a discussion session/presentation I delivered on patterns I’ve found among doctoral dissertations that have used phenomenology to study aspects of engineering education.

The closing ceremony for the conference was chaired by the incoming SEFI president, DIT’s Prof. Mike Murphy. We learned about the venue for next year’s conference, Budapest! Can’t wait!

img_9342I enjoyed dinner with close friends after the conference attendees dispersed. I got to explore Copenhagen a little on Saturday morning before flying off to a new conference in Greece.

Thanks to the whole SEFI crowd for a stellar week! See you in Hungry if not before!

Continental Conference-Hopping

img_4547It’s been a hectic few weeks, beginning with Inspirefest in Dublin, Ireland (21-22 June) to the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) conference in Salt Lake City (June 24-27), a quick visit to Virginia Tech and around the state, and ending today with the UK Royal Academy of Engineering and University College London Centre for Engineering Education’s symposium on Inclusive Engineering Education (July 9-10).

Inspirefest: Women in Tech

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Live drawing made during my sister Heather’s performance of “Hedy! The Live and Inventions of Hedy Lamar”, by Liza Donnelly.

Inspirefest is an annual celebration of women in technology, and this was its fourth year. It’s organized by Ann O’Dea and Silicon Republic. I attend the very first year it was held, and was invited this year as a VIP since my sister, Heather Massie, was performing the one-woman play she wrote, produces, and performs. The play is “Hedy! The Life and Inventions of Hedy Lamar” and Heather has been performing it all over the world. Just before heading to Dublin, she spent five weeks performing around Zimbabwe and South Africa. A major highlight of this year’s Inspirefest was Heather’s abbreviated 65-minute performance in one of Ireland’s largest theaters, the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre.

Other highlights this year were the opening address by Ireland’s Minister for Health, Simon Harris, Ranjani Kearsley’s talk, “it’s time to level the playing field”, meeting new friends and reconnecting with ones I’d met at the first Insirpefest, like head STEMette, Anne-Marie Imafadon. Many of the talks were recorded and made available online.

I’ve inserted a small gallery below with a few pictures from Inspirefest of Heather, me, and other special guests. My colleague and frequent co-author, Bill Williams flew in from Portugal on other business and joined us for Heather’s play. I’ve also included photos with Ann O’Dea, Anne-Marie Imafadon, and Mary Carty, who I met at the first Inspirefest.

ASEE

I hopped on a plane to Salt Lake City to attend my first ever ASEE conference. I presented two research papers at this event:

Chance, S. M. & Williams, W. (2018). Preliminary findings of a phenomenological study of Middle Eastern women’s experiences studying engineering in Ireland. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) conference in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Chance, S. M. & Duffy, G. (2018). A model for spurring organizational change based on faculty experiences working together to implement Problem-Based Learning. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) conference in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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My first ASEE conference!

You can download and read the papers at the links above. At ASEE, I met many people who I’ve been collaborating with online, and developed new friendships as well. I attended many sessions, caught up with colleagues like former Fulbright scholars to DIT, Drs. Stephanie Ferrall (the incoming ASEE president) and Sheryl Sorby (a director of the ASEE), and met some all-stars like Prof. John Heywood and Prof. Karl Smith. Professor Smith has been bringing experts and theories from student development to speak at this conference for decades, and I hope to carry on his work.

Virginia Tech–my home place

I made a stopover in Virginia, en route back to London, taking a few days to work from home as well as four days of holiday to visit family and friends.

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Visiting Nicky Wolmarans and Jenni Case at Virginia Tech.

Virginia Tech has one of the USA’s two university schools dedicated to Engineering Education, so I grabbed the opportunity to meet with the schools’ new head, Dr. Jennifer Case, and her colleague from the University of Cape Town, Dr. Nicky Wolmarans.

Other highlights of being in Virginia were visiting my dad, dear friends (Katie, Mary, John, Wendy), aunt and uncle (Kitty and Glen), former professor (Pam Eddy) and former student (Luanna Marins) and their families (Dave and Afonzo), some former colleagues (Tony), Virginia Beach (but for a very short 1.5 hours), and my mom for a visit to the Udvar Hazy Center (a branch of the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum near Dulles Airport).

Inclusive Engineering Education Symposium

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Got back to London in time for UCL’s two-day symposium on Inclusive Engineering Education Symposium!

Landing in London Sunday morning left me a bit of time to rest up for the Inclusive Engineering Education Symposium, hosted by my colleagues in UCL’s Centre for Engineering Education. This was a chance to hear from industry leaders as to what steps they have taken to diversify and to welcome a new publication by the Royal Academy and UCL with tools and techniques for making engineering classrooms more inclusive.

The picture gallery below shows all these events and more….

 

Work and play in South Africa: Teaching and sightseeing in Jo’burg

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I was filling in for Dr. Kate Roach, and she provided many of the slides. Fortunately, I was able to draw from three decades of running group learning activities and from my own research on teamwork and Problem Based Learning. It helped me bring the topics to life.

What a memorable four days Shade and I had in Johannesburg, teaching the master class on teamwork I recently blogged. In this post, I’m sharing photos Shade mailed me in addition to snapshots I took on our day of sightseeing.

This master class was one of eight organized by the University of Cape Town to help engineering educators in South Africa develop new knowledge and skills. The overall set of workshops is being taught by my employer, University College London and its Center for Engineering Education.

This was the fourth workshop in the series. This particular session was held at the OM Tambo conference center–the site, the weather, and the food were all amazing. The experience transformed my impression of Johannesburg and has me wanting to return. The overwhelming sense of Apartheid I felt on my prior visit had left me feeling anxious, but gaining insight and making diverse friends has me seeing the place with a new, more optimistic outlook.

Two engineering professors from the University of Johannesburg graciously offered to show us the city on the last day of our trip. Thanks to Johannes (Yannis) Bester and Zachary (Zach) Simpson spending the day with us and giving us an insider perspective of what it’s been like to live, work, and teach in Johannesburg.

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Dr. Folashade (Shade) Akinmolayan and me visiting the University of Johannesburg campus where Yannis and Zach teach engineering.

Thanks to Yannis and Zach we got to visit two campuses of the University of Johannesburg–including a stop off to Yannis’ home which is located on the main campus. We also got to visit two sites of my choosing: the Apartheid Museum and Constitution Hill.

The Apartheid Museum explains the history and events surrounding the system of Apartheid used in South Africa (1948-1991) to segregate people by race. It’s a scary history indeed, but one that we must not forget.

Of our sightseeing group, only two of us had visited this particular museum before.During my 2005 visit I’d not had enough time to absorb everything, and the same happened again. In the gallery below, you’ll see two fo the special exhibitions in the museum right now. One focuses on Nelson Mandela. The other focuses on Winnie Mandela.

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Visiting the Apartheid Museum is a very solum experience.

We broke for lunch at the Apartheid Museum and then continued on to Constitution Hill, a former jail where Nelson Mandela was briefly kept before he was moved to the prison on Robins Island. Political prisoners were considered the most dangerous to the Apartheid “leadership” and they were kept separate from other prisoners. During Apartheid one could be jailed for nearly anything and life in jail was truly awful for most. Nelson Mandela did convince many of the jailers on Robins Island to see his point-of-view and some to advocate for his release. Nevertheless, he spent 27 years behind bars for promoting his political beliefs.

Before seeing this exhibition, I hadn’t known how important his mother’s Christian values and his early schooling by Western missionaries had been on shaping Nelson Mandela’s outlook on life. I had wondered how he’d maintained his determination to resit Apartheid so peacefully, when even Winnie (his second of three wives) promoted violent resistance at times.

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Shade and I after the tour at Constitution Hill we took with Yannis.

Today, Constitution Hill is the site where South Africa’s Constitutional Court meets. This group of judges deliberates on constitutional matters only. The front door of the Court illustrates the fundamental principles of today’s South African Constitution. However, this court is constantly considering how to best protect and balance individual and collective rights.

At Constitution Hill we took a guided tour and we visited the formal court chambers as well as the former men’s and women’s prisons. The old stair wells have been left standing to help show the extent of the former prison, though much of the prison building was removed and the bricks used in the modernization. The entry lobby and the court chamber are lovely modern buildings designed by OMM Design Workshop and Urban Solutions. For more on the design of the building, please visit “THE STORY OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL COURT.”

I’ve posted seven separate photo galleries below:

  1. Conference center and workshop
  2. Driving through the city of Johannesburg and visiting the University of Jo’burg
  3. Apartheid Museum
  4. Nelson Mandela
  5. Winnie Mandela
  6. Constitution Hill court
  7. Constitution Hill former jails

Conference center and workshop

Jo’burg city and the University of Johannesburg

Apartheid Museum

Nelson Mandela

 

Winnie Mandela

Constitution Hill court

Constitution Hill former jails